Russula seta

Russula californiensis

The specific epithet virescens means «to turn green» in Latin.[23] The characteristic pattern of the surface of the petiole is alluded to in the common names of the species in Anglo-Saxon countries.[6][13] The distribution in North America is a matter of debate.
The distribution in North America is a matter of debate, where several similar species are also recognized, such as R. parvovirescens and R. crustosa.[24][34] One author even suggested that R. virescens «is strictly a European species»,[34] citing Buyck et al. (2006), who indicated that «the virescens-crustosa group is much more complex than suspected and encompasses at least a dozen taxa in the eastern United States.» [24] As in Europe, the species has a widespread distribution in Asia, with documented occurrence from India,[44] Malaysia,[45] Korea,[46] the Philippines,[47] Nepal,[48] China,[49] Thailand,[50] and Vietnam.[51] It is also found in North Africa and Central America.[52] The species is also found in North Africa and Central America.[52] The species is also found in the United States.

Russula pectinatoides

Russula is a genus of mycorrhizal fungi belonging to the order Russulales, which includes about 750 species. They are characterized by yellowish or white spores, generally free and light or white lamellae, and absence of partial veil or remnants of the volva on the stem. The species of the genus Lactarius, belonging to the same family, have similar characteristics, but exude latex when cut. The genus Russula was described by Christian Hendrik Persoon in 1796. In Latin, russula means ‘reddish’.
As in the genus Lactarius, the flesh of the fruiting bodies of Russula species have a characteristic consistency that causes them to break in a manner similar to the flesh of an apple. This aspect, together with the appearance of the lamellae and the foot, helps to identify them easily. They do not have any remains of the veil (no ring or remains of the veil attached to the cap). The lamellae are fragile and brittle, except in some cases, and cannot be bent parallel to the cap without breaking. The spore varies from white to orange to cream or yellowish colors.

Russula rubescens

Do you like to go mushroom picking in the countryside? Undoubtedly, this is an activity that can be very interesting, especially when you have a guide or you have installed in your cell phone an application that helps you to identify them. But in addition to these tools, you also have this blog. In fact, this time we are going to talk about edible russulas.
Edible russulas are native to temperate regions of the world, especially in the Old Continent. They grow in coniferous, deciduous or mixed forests. Therefore, they are adapted to live in areas where rainfall is abundant, summers are rather mild and winters are cold with frost.
They are very characteristic mushrooms: the mushroom or fruiting body can measure up to 11cm in height. They have a cap between 5 and 10 centimeters in diameter, with a hemispherical shape in young specimens, and convex and flattened in adults.
The cuticle is of variable reddish to reddish-brown color, darker in the center. The cuticle is easily detachable. The lamellae are 4 to 9 millimeters wide, bifurcate near the stipe and are somewhat greasy to the touch. When young, they are white, but as they mature they become cream colored.

Russula rhodocephala

Russula is a genus of mycorrhizal fungi belonging to the order Russulales, which includes about 750 species. They are characterized by yellowish or white spores, generally free and light-colored or white lamellae, and absence of partial veil or remains of the volva on the stem. The species of the genus Lactarius, belonging to the same family, have similar characteristics, but exude latex when cut. The genus Russula was described by Christian Hendrik Persoon in 1796. In Latin, russula means ‘reddish’.
As in the genus Lactarius, the flesh of the fruiting bodies of Russula species have a characteristic consistency that causes them to break in a manner similar to the flesh of an apple. This aspect, together with the appearance of the lamellae and the foot, helps to identify them easily. They do not have any remains of the veil (no ring or remains of the veil attached to the cap). The lamellae are fragile and brittle, except in some cases, and cannot be bent parallel to the cap without breaking. The spore varies from white to orange to cream or yellowish colors.

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